Tamara Keith

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Former President Barack Obama re-entered public life today with an appearance in Chicago. He kept it decidedly nonpartisan. NPR's Tamara Keith reports from Chicago.

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In an official statement, President Trump described the recent chemical attack in Syria as "reprehensible" and went on to argue the "heinous actions by the Bashar al-Assad regime are a consequence of the past administration's weakness and irresolution." In other words, he blamed former President Barack Obama.

It is perhaps no surprise that first lady Melania Trump's first official portrait is a glamour shot. The former model's bio page on the White House website goes into great detail about her career in the field.

The White House released the photo on Monday, with a simple press release stating that the photo was taken in the residence at the White House.

"I am honored to serve in the role of First Lady, and look forward to working on behalf of the American people over the coming years," Trump says in the announcement.

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Seventy-one days into Donald Trump's presidency, it's safe to say things haven't gone as planned for anyone. This week dominated by headlines about Russia is just the latest proof, as NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith reports.

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The negotiator-in-chief couldn't seal the deal.

President Trump, the former businessman who has never been shy about touting his negotiating skills, has for several weeks been involved in a high-profile negotiation and persuasion effort with members of his own party in an effort to pass the American Health Care Act.

That effort failed.

But this is how Trump sold himself.

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The House was supposed to vote this afternoon on the Republican bill to replace the Affordable Care Act. But instead, at the president's urging, House Speaker Paul Ryan abruptly pulled the bill. Ryan described it this way.

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Republican leaders plan to bring the American Health Care Act to the floor of the House for a vote next Thursday, and President Trump is now publicly applying his deal-making skills to ensure passage.

"I just want to let the world know, I am 100 percent in favor," Trump told reporters brought to the Oval Office to see the tail end of his meeting with about a dozen members of the Republican Study Committee. That group of House members includes some who'd been lukewarm about the bill going into the meeting.

President Trump's budget blueprint calls for eliminating dozens of government programs and zeroing out funding for 19 independent agencies. And that may only be a preview of things to come as the Trump administration seeks to reorganize the executive branch.

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Tom Hanks of Sully, Joe Versus the Volcano, Forrest Gump and Wait Wait Don't Tell Me fame wants the White House press corps to stay caffeinated.

The Oscar-winning actor sent a fancy Pasquini espresso machine and a bunch of espresso pods along with a typewritten note, which arrived on Thursday.

"To the White House Press Corps," Hanks wrote. "Keep up the good fight for Truth, Justice, and the American Way. Especially the Truth part."

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At a press conference this afternoon, Attorney General Jeff Sessions made an announcement.

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In a lunch meeting with television anchors before the president's address to Congress Tuesday — a meeting that has traditionally been largely off the record — President Trump said he was open to another attempt at an immigration overhaul.

Initially, the White House (which has been critical of anonymous sourcing) insisted that the news not be attributed to the president.

John Yang of the PBS NewsHour was among those in attendance:

When 2011 began, the worst recession in two generations was technically over, but Annica Trotter, Ray Meyer, and Jennifer and Brian Barfield were unemployed and searching for work. Six years later, their experience demonstrates life doesn't just snap back to normal after a job loss. Their economic recovery remains incomplete and in some ways their story is America's story.

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When President Trump has been given the opportunity to talk about anti-Semitism, he has sidestepped the issue multiple times until today, as NPR's Tamara Keith reports

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President Trump is returning to the campaign trail Saturday night. Yes, it's less than a month into his presidency. But Trump's campaign, which never shut down after he won the election, is organizing the rally in Melbourne, Fla.

It's been a tumultuous start for Trump — from alternative facts about the size of his inauguration crowd, to courts halting his travel ban executive order and this week having to ask his national security adviser to resign. But now Trump is returning to the comfortable embrace of a campaign rally.

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It's been a fast-paced and rocky start for the Trump White House. There have been reports of infighting and even talk of a possible staff shakeup after just three weeks. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us now. Hi, Tam.

Updated on Feb. 10 at 1:40 p.m. ET.

If President Trump were to call a meeting of his Cabinet today, he wouldn't need a very big table. Or, he'd have to invite a bunch of Obama administration holdovers serving temporarily in acting roles.

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