Lori Walsh

In the Moment Host

South Dakota Public Broadcasting is pleased to announce Lori Walsh is the new host for Dakota Midday, SDPB Radio’s live news and issues program which broadcasts weekdays from Noon-1pm (11am-Noon MT).

Walsh most recently worked as a freelance journalist for the Sioux Falls Argus Leader and as a Humanities Scholar for the South Dakota Humanities Council, leading veteran writing groups. A graduate of Sioux Falls Lincoln High School and Augustana University’s journalism program, Walsh is a writer, blogger, photographer, poet, and member of the National Book Critics Circle and Society for Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators. Walsh also served in the United States Marine Corps for six years, working as a cryptologic Korean linguist.

“It’s a huge responsibility to take the helm of Dakota Midday. It’s so well-established, successful, trusted,” says Walsh. “It’s a great comfort to come into something and know I don’t have to re-invent anything. On the other hand, I can look to the future and say, ‘where is this going next?’ It’s exciting to say it can continue to get better, to grow. The conversation can continue. I’m thrilled to be a part of it. I’m a listener and now I’m a host.”

If you’re feeling exhausted, depleted, and burned out, you might have something in common with your doctor. Forty six percent of all physicians now report experiencing burnout. That’s a 16 percent increase in the past two years. 

Jill Kruse, DO,  is the medical director for Avera’s LIGHT program, a well-being initiative for healthcare providers. She talks about avoiding and healing from burnout with tips gleaned from the struggles and successes of exhausted doctors.

photo courtesy of 1881 Courthouse Museum

Horatio Ross accompanied General George Custer on the 1874 Black Hills Expedition and discovered gold on French Creek near what is now the city of Custer. Although Ross staked his claim to several local sites and remained in the town for 30 years, he died a pauper at the age of 66. He is buried in Custer Cemetery.

Gary Enright, director of the 1881 Courthouse Museum, explains the legacy of Ross and the coincidence that links him to James Marshall, who discovered one of the richest gold fields in history, 25 years before Ross tried to strike it rich in the Black Hills.

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