Lori Walsh

In the Moment Host

South Dakota Public Broadcasting is pleased to announce Lori Walsh is the new host for Dakota Midday, SDPB Radio’s live news and issues program which broadcasts weekdays from Noon-1pm (11am-Noon MT).

Walsh most recently worked as a freelance journalist for the Sioux Falls Argus Leader and as a Humanities Scholar for the South Dakota Humanities Council, leading veteran writing groups. A graduate of Sioux Falls Lincoln High School and Augustana University’s journalism program, Walsh is a writer, blogger, photographer, poet, and member of the National Book Critics Circle and Society for Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators. Walsh also served in the United States Marine Corps for six years, working as a cryptologic Korean linguist.

“It’s a huge responsibility to take the helm of Dakota Midday. It’s so well-established, successful, trusted,” says Walsh. “It’s a great comfort to come into something and know I don’t have to re-invent anything. On the other hand, I can look to the future and say, ‘where is this going next?’ It’s exciting to say it can continue to get better, to grow. The conversation can continue. I’m thrilled to be a part of it. I’m a listener and now I’m a host.”

Colonel Karen Lloyd (U.S. Army), director of the Library of Congress' Veterans History Project, talks about collecting war stories this Veterans Day and how volunteers in South Dakota can participate.

Learn more by going to www.loc.gov/vets. E-Mail at vohp@loc.gov or call 1-888-371-5848.

South Dakota State Historical Society

SDPB's Brian Gevik and "Science Steve" Rokusek join Dakota Midday for this week's Images of the Past feature that includes more than the Belle Fourche Sugar Plant. This fun segment also veers into some of Science Steve's experiments and talk about haunted places in South Dakota!

In a presidential election where both major party candidates have disapproval ratings of over 50%, Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson says he offers an alternative. The former governor of New Mexico joined Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to discuss Country of Origin Labeling, what to do about Aleppo, and his plan to take the White House which relies on neither major party candidate reaching the required 270 electoral votes for victory.

Seth Tupper (Rapid City Journal) and Dana Ferguson (Argus Leader Media) join Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to discuss the top political headlines in the state. This week we discuss recent polling data, the logic behind the ban on ballot selfies, and the resonance of Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson as he campaigns in South Dakota.

Lee Strubinger

Bruce Ellison is Rapid City Attorney who has worked in Indian Country for decades.  Today is taking part in the legal defense for those resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline crossing of the Missouri River near the Standing Rock Reservation. Ellison joins Dakota Midday to talk about the changing nature of the protests and why he wants the pipeline stopped.  

Libertarian Party

Libertarian Presidential Candidate Gary Johnson is visiting South Dakota this week.  Johnson served as the Republican Governor of New Mexico from 1995 to 2003.   Today, Johnson says Libertarians are a viable alternative between the two major party candidates for president.

Johnson is speaking on Wednesday, October 26 at 6:00 PM at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center in Rapid City.   His running mate, former Massachusetts Republican Governor Bill Weld campaigned in the state last week.

Johnson sat down with SDPB’s Lori Walsh for this interview. 

In partnership with Prairie Public Broadcasting, Dakota Midday brings you a conversation between Prairie Public's Doug Hamilton and Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier. The two discuss the financial cost of the Dakota Access Pipeline protests, the role of law enforcement, and what happens next in relations between law enforcement and tribal leadership.

Doug Hamilton is the host of Main Street on Prairie Public Broadcasting in North Dakota.

SDPB's Andrew Bork joins us with an update on one woman's search for the 84 men who signed a spoil of war. Bork shares the original segment from Dakota Life as well as new conversations with the women who found a Nazi banner in her mother's attic.

Craig Stevens is a spokesman for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, or the MAIN Coalition. He joins Dakota Midday for a conversation on the latest developments on the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Robin Shulman

Freelance journalist Robin Shulman of New York City comes to South Dakota State University for the Pulitzer Center of Crisis Reporting visit. Her lecture is called "In Canada, People Like You & Me Can Sponsor Syrian Refugees. Here's What Happens." Shulman talks about her work covering immigration, poverty, urban policy, and other issues in U.S. cities, the Middle East and other parts of the world.

University of Sioux Falls

Poet Kevin Cole discusses his latest book Late Summer Plums. Cole reads passages from the collection which is inspired by geography, landscape and forgotten places. He's joined by his publisher Steve Boint of Scurfpea Publishing. Boint talks about shifts in the publishing industry.

Dakota Political Junkies Jon Hunter and Roger Whittle discuss South Dakota's U.S. House and Senate races including Democratic House candidate Paula Hawks' announcement that she was sexually assaulted while attending college. Democratic candidates Hawks and Jay Williams trail Republican Incumbents Kristi Noem and John Thune in fundraising by large sums.

The Political Junkies also discussed problems with the Affordable Care Act. Recently, Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton said, "The Affordable Care Act is no longer affordable."

FRONTLINE

Tonight at 9:00 p.m. Central on SDPB-TV, FRONTLINE and ProPublica present "Terror in Europe," an inside look at Europe's attempt to combat the terrorism threat as ISIS loses ground in the Middle East, but strikes out elsewhere. In the wake of the Charlie Hebdo, Paris and Brussels attacks, correspondent Sebastian Rotella examines why Europe remains so vulnerable. Rotella discussed the new FRONTLINE/ProPublica film on Dakota Midday.

Dr. Matthew Moen, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Dakota, discusses his current Democracy and Civility tour. He focuses on ideas large and small to improve civility, particularly in legislatures. Moen has presentations scheduled across the state.

www.npr.org

FRONTLINE correspondent Martin Smith joins Dakota Midday to discuss his new film, "Confronting ISIS." Smith investigates U.S. led efforts to defeat the terror group with on-the-ground reporting from Iraq, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Turkey and candid interviews from inside Washington, D.C.'s corridors of power. "Confronting ISIS" is a two-hour FRONTLINE special that airs Tuesday (10/11) at 8:00 p.m. Central on SDPB-TV.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

In a debate this week, Republican Congresswoman Krist Noem and challenger Democrat Paula Hawks reveal they’re sticking to party lines this election. Noem says she’s voting for Donald Trump, and Hawks is casting her ballot for Hillary Clinton. SDPB's Kealey Bultena joins Dakota Midday with insight from the Noem/Hawks Rotary debate, including thoughts from US Representative Kristi Noem on why she is still casting her ballot for Republican nominee Trump and the reasons Hawks' vote goes to Clinton.

SDPB's Gary Ellenbolt spends a day in Winner to take in the tradition of a Winner Warriors high school football game. From tuning in to the local radio station, to visiting with locals and members of the football program, Ellenbolt provides a "day in the life" of Winner on football day.

Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh visited with two-time Pulitzer Prize winner T.J. Stiles at the SD Festival of Books. Stiles discusses his latest book, Custer's Trials. General George Armstrong Custer may be a popular figure, but he's not necessarily well understood. Stiles talks about Custer's explosive and often self-destructive behavior, his bigotry, and how he existed within a "frontier of time."

www.npr.org

Dr. Emily Wanless of Augustana University and Dr. Sara Lampert of the University of South Dakota are part of a Wednesday panel discussion, "Gender and Politics: What Does the 2016 Election Tell Us?" The event features six experts from media, communications and political science. They'll discuss the candidacy of Hillary Clinton, accusations of her lack of stamina and how American politics pivots to accommodate its first female presidential candidate from a major party. Wednesday's discussion begins at 7:00 p.m. at the Al Neuharth Media Center on the USD campus.

Kealey Bultena / SDPB

Thousands of South Dakotans must change doctors and clinics if they want their health insurance to cover the care. Starting January 1, 2017, Sanford Health no longer accepts Avera insurance including DakotaCare, and Avera Health in South Dakota isn't taking Sanford Health Plan insurance. That leaves some people who can't afford to pay out of pocket with little choice, and it requires others to leave trusted medical providers to find new services that work with their insurance.

www.npr.org

Jonathan Ellis of the Sioux Falls Argus Leader discusses last night's Vice Presidential Debate between Tim Kaine and Mike Pence. He also touched on ballot issues and legislation that protects physicians from fraud charges.

Black Hills State University hosts Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Michael Chabon. His visit is part of a year-long series of events led by the South Dakota Humanities Council. It coincides with the centennial of the Pulitzer Prize.

Michael Chabon won the Pulitzer in 2001 for the Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. His latest novel is released on November 21 from Harper Collins. It’s called Moonglow.

Chabon speaks on the topic “Thanks, Teach: Remembering Four Writing Mentors” Wednesday, October 5, at 7 p.m. in the student union at Black Hills State.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are two of the most polarizing presidential candidates in modern history.

Tonight, FRONTLINE’s acclaimed election-year series, “The Choice,” returns — going behind the headlines to investigate what has shaped these two candidates, where they came from, how they lead and why they want one of the most difficult jobs imaginable. FRONTLINE airs at 8:00 p.m. Central on SDPB-TV.

Pulitzer Prize-winning book reviewer Michael Dirda takes a look back at a career as a professional reader. From reading beyond the obvious to why hoarding has gotten a bad name, Dirda talks about the Golden Age of children’s literature, the value of books you never open, and his role in creating the success of mainstream science fiction and fantasy.

USD political science professor Mike Card joins Dakota Midday to talk about the first debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

J. Ryan Stradal is the author of Kitchens of the Great Midwest. A Minnesota native, Stradal lives in Los Angeles, where he is an editor at Unnamed Press and the Nervous Breakdown and co-producer and host of the literary/culinary series Hot Dish. Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh spoke with Stradal at the SD Festival of Books.

Janice Law founded the American Women Writers National Museum to showcase America's top-tier women writers. Law is a retired Texas criminal court judge, a 14-year print journalist, a travel columnist and the author of six books. Her most recent book, American Evita: Lurleen Wallace, was released last year. Law appeared at this year's SD Festival of Books in Brookings.

Two-time U.S. Poet Laureate and winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry, Ted Kooser attended the SD Festival of Books. He took time to visit with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh to talk about his notebooks, the trance of poetry and the moment he learned he had been awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

www.kfyrtv.com

Craig Stevens, spokesman for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now, or the MAIN Coalition, updates Dakota Midday on the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

www.speakerpedia.com

Marc Lynch, author of The New Arab Wars: Uprisings and Anarchy in the Middle East, presented "Making Sense of the New Arab Wars" during the SD Festival of Books. Lynch's narrative of a vital region's collapse is both wildly dramatic, and shows that the regions upheavals have only just begun. Lynch visited with Dakota Midday host Lori Walsh before his Festival of Books appearance in Brookings.

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